• Live Stream Link with Palau Wave Radio and listen live to *Local Musics / *Christian Songs & Programs / *Public Awareness Programs / *Talk Shows / *Conferences / *Announcements & many more!

Janiz "Jae" Ruetinag

Palau International Coral Reef Center
1 M-Dock Road
P.O. Box 7086
Koror, Palau 96940
picrc.org/picrcpage

Press Release
Contact: Ines Kintoki
Phone: 488-6950 ext. 244
Email: ikintoki@picrc.org
For Immediate Release
Date: 05/23/2017

The Palau International Coral Reef Center has been receiving donations for the 2018 Arts and Tides Calendar over the past few months. We want to thank some of the generous supporters who have been able to help us with the production of our calendar. Among some of our earlier donors are: Blue Bay Petroleum Incorporated, NgaraMaiberel Women’s Group of Koror, The Republic of China (Taiwan) and Palau Pacific Resort. Thank you all, we look forward to sharing the finished calendar!

Contact Ines Kintoki @ikintoki@picrc.org to make a donation or call 488-6950.

Palau International Coral Reef Center
1 M-Dock Road
P.O. Box 7086
Koror, Palau 96940
picrc.org/picrcpage

Press Release
Contact: Ines Kintoki
Phone: 488-6950 ext. 244
Email: ikintoki@picrc.org
For Immediate Release
Date: 05/22/2017

PICRC partners with IAEA to assess Harmful Algal Blooms in Palau

Harmful Algal Blooms, or HABS, produce toxins that have a potentially devastating, wide range of effects that are a threat to marine and freshwater ecosystems.

Last month, Palau International Reef Center (PICRC) Research & Aquarium Director, Geraldine Rengiil attended a workshop with the International Atomic Energy Agency on approaches to reduce the adverse impacts of harmful algal toxins on seafood safety.  The HAB Programme of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission UNESCO has been developed to further management and research, better understand causes of HAB, predict occurrences, and diminish their effects.

Palau will be one of the study sites for HABs.  Palau’s coastal communities and economic interests depend on fishery and aquatic resources that can be adversely affected by HABs. It is beneficial to have management and mitigation strategies developed to reduce the severity of HAB impacts, with an emphasis on minimizing the risk of human exposure. Key among the management tools employed to protect public health are monitoring programs aimed at detecting HAB toxins as they occur in both the algae that produce them and the fishery resources contaminated by these toxins.   While HABs is not a current issue in Palau, it does pose a potential threat for the future.

HABs include an abundance of algal species that can cause harm to humans, wildlife, and ecosystems and have continued to increase in frequency, duration, and distribution over the past several decades. These microalgae are abundant in coastal marine ecosystems worldwide and although toxigenic species represent only a small percent of the total number, new toxin producing species continue to be discovered. A widely believed explanation for this trend is anthropogenic factors such as; nutrient enrichment, ballast water introductions, enhanced aquaculture activities, and, more recently, global climate change/variability.

In Palau, there have been suspected cases of ciguatera poisoning, an illness that arises from eating contaminated reef fish, as well as occurrences of fish kills.  PICRC will collaborate with agencies such as Division of Environmental Health and Environmental Quality Protection Board to conduct and establish baselines on existence of HAB toxins and monitor exposure to contaminated seafood in Palau. This information would benefit consumers of marine resources and enable them to make informed decision on where they fish within their marine environment. Additionally, this information would benefit food and water regulatory agencies, policy makers, and the food and tourism industry in Palau.

>>An algal bloom is a rapid increase or accumulation in the population of algae in freshwater or marine water systems, and is recognized by the discoloration in the water from their pigments.[2] Cyanobacteria were mistaken for algae in the past, so cyanobacterial blooms are sometimes also called algal blooms. Blooms which can injure animals or the ecology are called “harmful algal blooms” (HAB), and can lead to fish die-offs, cities cutting off water to residents, or states having to close fisheries.<<[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algal_bloom]

The Lord’s Prayer…Hallowed Be Thy Name – Pt 2

May 21, 2017

Palau International Coral Reef Center
1 M-Dock Road
P.O. Box 7086
Koror, Palau 96940
picrc.org/picrcpage

Press Release
Contact: Ines Kintoki
Phone: 488-6950 ext. 244
Email: ikintoki@picrc.org
For Immediate Release
Date: 05/17/2017

Blue Bay Petroleum Incorporated supports PICRCs Summer Internship Program

 Last year, as a result of Palau’s 2016 Year of the Youth Small Grant Scheme, the Palau International Coral Reef Center (PICRC) received a grant from the Government of India to support PICRCs Summer Internship Program. The program, focusing on building science and environmental capacity in Palau’s youth, was incredibly successful among the eight Palauan interns who joined PICRC. Now, to continue this program, PICRC has received a donation of $5,000 from Blue Bay Petroleum Incorporated.

Blue Bay has been a supporter of many programs relating to the environment, sports, culture and the arts, and have continued to be a supporter for PICRC. Year after year , they have donated to our Arts and Tides Calendar, and fundraising events. “Blue Bay is excited to be part of this year’s PICRC Summer Internship Program and to be able to support participating students’ learning experience”, stated the Sales Station Manager for Blue Bay, Ralph Moses, “We wish them all the best and we hope to see them soon here in Palau in the future”.

The Summer Internship Program allows high school and college students the chance to gain research experience and build employable skills relating to marine research and resource management. Additionally, the program provides students the opportunity to work closely with a mentor on a variety of topics relating to conservation. Through this internship, students develop a network of long-lasting professional contacts for their future careers.

These internships are as valuable to PICRC as they are to the students. New interns bring new energy and fresh ideas to the Center and in return, we provide them with a chance to work towards a career in the field of conservation. PICRC researcher, Victor Nestor, started as an intern back in 2007 and returned as a researcher after completing his Bachelor’s degree in 2012. Now, Mr. Nestor has a Masters in Marine Science from the University of the Ryukyus (UoR) in Okinawa, Japan. “My internship at PICRC helped me narrow down my educational interests,” Mr. Nestor commented on his internship with PICRC. “I’m very grateful for this program that has lead me to two degrees and a career in marine biology”.

The Summer Internship Program would not be possible without Blue Bay’s  generous contribution and we are incredibly grateful for their continued support.

Subed el mora Buai

A Palau Community College (PCC) a chodengeseterir a rokui el ngalek ra skuul el mo tuobed er chelchal rrak ra rokui el skuul er Belau. Dirrek el nguu tial techall e mengemedaol ra buai el mei ra mong meng okeim ma euang el lomelilt (54th Commencement Exercises) ra skuul el mo er ngii ra ongeim lureor el teruich ma etiu el kebesengil elcheang el buil (May 19, 2017) ra teruich el klok ra tutau (10:00am) ra PCC Cafeteria. Mei me desterir a rengeleked er tial sils er tir a mocha ngmai a babilengir ra daingak.

MEETING >>> THURSDAY, MAY 18, 2017 @ 6:30pm >>>> MEDALAII, KOROR

May 17, 2017

1 2 3 135
Categories
Archives