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Yolanda Kloulubak

Press Release

For Immediate Release
Date: 08/21/2017

Contact: Ines Kintoki
Phone: 488-6950 ext. 244
Email: ikintoki@picrc.org

Anna Parker
Communications and Outreach Officer
Palau International Coral Reef Center
P.O. Box 7086 1 M-Dock Road
(680) 488-6950 www.picrc.org

 

Continued Monitoring of the Protected Areas Network 

In 2015, Palau International Coral Reef Center (PICRC) conducted baseline surveys in 13 of the 14 Protected Area Network (PAN) sites to track changes in coral reef and seagrass habitats. This month, PICRC has begun the second round of monitoring in these sites, starting with Ngelukes Conservation Area.

In the next twelve months, PICRC will conduct surveys in, Medal Ngediull Conservation Area, Angaur State Conservation Zone, Ngeruangel Marine Reserve, Ngerumekaol Spawning Area, Ngermedellim Management Area,  Ebiil Channel Conservation Area, Ngermasech Conservation Area, Ileyakl Beluu Conservation Area, Oreuaol Ibuchel Conservation Area, Ngemai Conservation Area, and Teluleu Conservation Area.  Helen Reef is also a PAN site but because of its distance from the main island, it is logistically hard to get to.  PICRC is hoping that Helen Reef can be surveyed in the coming year along with the rest of the PAN sites.

Marine Protected Areas (MPA) are a practical tool for conserving marine resources against human threats, but without proper management these areas may be irrelevant. In baseline surveys the lagoon MPA’s tended to have the lowest ecological scores of all habitats. While MPA’s on average increase fish biomass and species diversity in channels and the outer reef, land-based pollution is a significant driver to the poor ecological conditions of nearshore seagrass beds.

By conducting these surveys researchers are able to make recommendations to resource managers to reduce the amount of sedimentation flowing out of rivers and onto these important ecosystems. Additionally, sampling the PAN sites every two years will allow researchers to provide practical information to the PAN Office in order to develop a more resilient network of protected areas.

Olkeriil “O” Kazuo
Press Secretary
Office of the President
Republic of Palau

On August 17, 2017 the Aimeliik Community and the Aimeliik Club of Guam donated five pallets of patient supplies to the Ministry of Health. The patient necessity items shipped from Guam included Pediatric Breathing Hoses, wheel chairs, I.V. poles, commodes, adult disposable briefs, sterile gloves, manual dispensers, toiletries and much more.  In the handover ceremony, Delegate Marino O. Ngemaes (Aimeliik, 10th OEK) expressed that the people of Aimeliik wish to contribute to the success of the “Adopt a Room” Program at the Hospital by equipping and providing in-patients with necessities that would otherwise be added costs to the patients.

“The People of Aimeliik thank Ambros Inc. of Guam and Shimbros Inc. of Palau for their generous donations for the cause including Triple B Forwarders, Matson Shipping, Belau Shipping and Belau Transfer for waiving the costs and fees in shipping the items to Palau, said Delegate Marino.”  “We would like to also thank Senators Aric Nakamura and Frank Kyota for their invaluable assistance in making our donations to the hospital possible and I truly thank the Aimeliik Club of Guam for taking the initiative to provide these quality items for donation.” Delegate Marino added.

Minister of Health, Emais Roberts thanked the Aimeliik Club of Guam and the people of Aimeliik for their generous contribution to the patients of the hospital.  “The people of Aimeliik have been a great partner to the Ministry of Health with numerous volunteer works with the hospital and we appreciate these many items that will surely help our patients and staff in treatment and comfort.” Minister Emais Expressed.

In attendance at the ceremony were President Tommy Remengesau, Jr., Speaker Sabino Anastacio, Aimeliik Speaker Teruo Rengulbai, members of the Aimeliik Legislature and the Ministry of Health management team with many more.

 

PRESS RELEASE
For Immediate Release
Date: 08/14/17

Contact: Ines Kintoki
Phone: 488-6950 ext. 244
Email:ikintoki@picrc.org

Anna Parker
Communications and Outreach Officer
Palau International Coral Reef Center
P.O. Box 7086 1 M-Dock Road
(680) 488-6950 www.picrc.org

 

Palau’s coral reefs are resilient, according to a 15-year study by PICRC

Worldwide, coral reefs are being impacted by disturbances. As global temperatures rise, bleaching events and extreme weather events are likely to increase. Through ecological monitoring researchers are able to track changes to better understand how coral reefs are impacted and how they recover from these large disturbances.

Until 2001, there had been no comprehensive coral reef monitoring on disturbance impacts, coral mortality, or recovery time for Palau’s coral reefs at an island scale. This lack of data left many questions unanswered following the 1998 bleaching event. In response to this gap in knowledge, Palau International Coral Reef Center (PICRC) established their long-term coral reef monitoring program.  Information from the coral reef monitoring programs can be used to tell us the status of Palau’s reefs and track and document changes resulting from large disturbances.

A new report by PICRC researchers presents the results of PICRCs 15-year study on Palau’s coral reefs.  The results showed that most coral reef communities recovered from the 1998 coral bleaching event, but it took at least 10 years for them to fully recover. PICRC researchers discovered that in all reefs habitats the areas covered by corals gradually began to increase in 2002 and continued to recover and regain their stable structure.   A notable exception is found in the eastern reefs of Palau because of the severe damage caused Typhoon Bopha and Haiyan in 2012 and 2013. The coral communities within this area were not fully recovered from the 1998 bleaching when the typhoons hit and are just now starting to recover.

This study demonstrates PICRC’s efforts to continue monitoring over the years consistently using the same methods. Thanks to this data collection, researchers are able to understand the past and current status of Palau’s coral reefs, and how disturbances have impacted them. It is extremely important to continue monitoring efforts to inform the public, stakeholders and policy makers on the impacts from large disturbances and the reality of reefs recovery time following them.

A copy of this report can be accessed through the PICRC website (picrc.org) under Research Publications and Technical Reports or from the PICRC library. Please contact Ines Kintoki at ikintoki@picrc.org for further questions or comments.

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