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Palau International Coral Reef Center
Press Release
Contact: Ines Kintoki
Phone: 488-6950 ext. 244
Date: July 16,2017

“PICRC Summer Interns from left to right and top to bottom: Onglibl Diana-Rae Lakobong, Maikani Osisemereng Andres, Kaylee Giramur, Yubee K. Isaac, Itungelbai Bells, and Kelutel Darrin Yoshiwo”

 

Six Palauan college students complete  their PICRC Summer Internship  

Friday July 14th marked the final day of the Palau International Coral Reef Center (PICRC) Summer Internship Program. The students selected for this summer’s program were Maikani Osisemereng Andres and Onglibl Diana-Rae Lakobong, Environmental and Marine Science majors from Palau Community College; Itungelbai Bells and Kelutel Darrin Yoshiwo, Marine Biology majors from University of Guam; Kaylee Giramur, an Environmental Studies major from Chaminade University of Honolulu; and Yubee K. Isaac, an Environmental Studies major from the University of Hawaii at Hilo. Throughout the program these interns worked on individual projects with mentors from PICRC. To complete the internship program each intern presented on their project and what they have learned over the past month and a half.

Throughout the past six weeks PICRC interns gained field and lab work experience, data handling skills, and a deeper knowledge of the research being conducted at PICRC. The interns also were given the opportunity to work with the Ebiil Society as part of their Cultural Immersion Program. For a week, interns worked as staff for Camp Ebiil with nearly 50 students from across Palau. During this week interns acquired local knowledge of marine and terrestrial ecosystems as well as traditional customs, to understand how Palau’s history plays a role in today’s conservation efforts.

These internships are key building blocks to future careers. Internships give students the opportunity to work hands on in a professional environment, gain connections and learn how to communicate in a professional environment. Students are also given a chance to explore career interest and narrow down their plans upon graduating. Through the PICRC Summer Internship Program, students gain a deeper understanding of current conservation efforts in Palau. Upon completing their degrees PICRC wishes to see these students return to work in Palau and continue conservation efforts at home. PICRC would like to recognize and give thanks to Blue Bay Petroleum Incorporated for making this Summer Internship possible.

 

Talkshow w/ PNCC’s Acting General Mangager, Leo Ben Teriong and Corporate Administrator, Myers Techitong, regarding the current phone issues and internet problems in Palau.

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Kemeldiil er a BECHEKLDIL MASAE YOSHIWO

~Mlo smecher: July 4, 2017
~ Kemeldiil: July 21, 2017
~Tuobed ra mork ra 8:30am ra tutau el mora blai ra Ngeribukel el ngara Ngerbeched,
e mengemeldiil el mo ieta sils e mora ked.

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Kemeldiil me a Omengkad el blals er a IMEKEDONG MOKISONG JOHNSON

~Mlo smecher: July 5, 2017
~Kemeldiil: July 22, 2017
~A bedengel ngka el mechas a tuobed er a mork ra 7am ra tutau e mora btelulachang
er a Arkemais ra 7:30am e tuobed el mora Ngcheyangel el mo mengemeldiil ma omengkad
el blals ea telial sils eng mochu ra ked.
Ng kemanget el omerael me ng mla moterkokl el mo er ngii a omengudel el udoud ra kebesengei
ra July 20 el di mor ngii ra blil a Ebil ra Ureked Emau Hindenburk ra Ngerchemai.

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Press Release SPR 10-23
July 12, 2017
Senate 10th Olbiil Era Kelulau – Statement from the President
For Immediate Release

 

Senate Joint Resolution No. 10-11 : Urging His Excellency Tommy E. Remengesau Jr., President of the Republic of Palau to establish a Trade Agreement with the People’s Republic of China was introduced on May 25, 2015 by Senate President Hokkons Baules. The resolution’s legislative findings state that “In order for the Republic of Palau to advance and develop its economy, all avenues should be explored to facilitate a sustainable economic future for the Republic.” Options that include the consideration of a trade agreement with the People’s Republic of China should be considered. A similar Senate Joint Resolution No. 10-12 was introduced on the same day by Senator Regis Akitaya and Camsek Elias Chin and awaits committee consideration.

As recently reported in the media, Senate Joint Resolution 10-11 was placed on the Agenda of the fifth day of the Third Special Session on July 5, 2017 with an accompanying Standing Committee Report No. 10-45 submitted by the Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and State Matters Chaired by Senator Aric Nakamura. Following discussions on the floor, the Committee Report was adopted while SJR 10-11 did not receive enough votes for adoption.

A report on the Island Times newspaper attributes the same day announcement by the Senate President to remove Senator Reklai as Chairman of the Committee on Tourism and Development Committee to his “no” vote on SJR 10-11. Without confirming other possible reasons, the writer reports this as the sole purpose for removal and reports it as uncontested truth when it is not. On record, Senator Reklai expressed support for efforts to explore trade and other agreements between the People’s Republic of China and Palau in statements made during the Fourth Day of the Third Special Session, contrary to his dissenting vote made later on the resolution. The article further quotes President Baules on a response he purportedly made. This comment is erroneous and lends neither veracity to the statement nor credibility to its undisclosed source, all in the name of “reliable news reporting”. One may surmise you can create so called news as you please or cry wolf in the name of the same if you were the publisher.

The President of the Senate made an announcement for the removal of Senator Reklai as Chairman of the Tourism and Development Committee and as a member of the Foreign Affairs and State Matters Committee, stating as well that appropriate resolutions to conform to any requirements outlined in the Rules of Procedures of the Senate 10th Olbiil Era Kelulau will be forthcoming in this Third Regular Session of the Senate. This is fact.

Each Senator of the Olbiil Era Kelulau has the privilege to influence and to persuade other members to vote one way or another or to be convinced to take a particular view on any given issue. This actually brings out the passion in healthy debate and heated discussions on any given issue that eventually result in a stated position of the institution of congress. Senator Reklai, as with any other Senator may continue to participate in these debates at his discretion, relying on tactful persuasion and political finesse or continue to engage in these floor debates of congress in the pages of his Island Times newspaper.

The Leadership of the Senate of the 10th Olbiil Era Kelulau does not share the most recently published opinion that the electorate should be alarmed when the Executive Branch and both Houses of the Olbiil Era Kelulau are mindful that cooperation and compromise is key to its deliberations and the resolve of decisions that best serve the electorate. It will continue to perform its work in the interest of the public, less the dramatic flair of impulsive bickering.

 

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Ministry of Justice
Serial No. PR -17-023
Keiden Kintol
July 12, 2017

 

Case Dismissal – ROP v. Inis Remoket

Upon request of the Minister of Justice, the following is provided to assist the public in understanding case dismissals and the considerations that accompany filing and/or dismissing criminal charges.

The First principle to understand is the governing concept that a prosecutor occupies a unique position in the legal framework. Whereas all other attorneys are tasked solely with zealously advocating for their client’s interests, the prosecution has a much more ambiguous responsibility to not merely seek conviction, but to see that justice is done. This responsibility is reflected in the Rules that govern filing a case and the discretion that a Prosecutor exercises in case disposition.

The second principle that needs to be understood is the presumption of innocence and burden of proof. A person is presumed innocent and cannot be arrested by police without some basis for doing so: this level of proof required of police arrest is referred to as “probable cause.” Probable Cause has been defined by some courts as “facts or circumstances that would lead a reasonable person to believe a crime has been committed and that the person arrested committed a crime.” There are actually a number of these levels of proof in the legal system, with the lowest level labeled “reasonable suspicion” and the highest level of proof labeled,  “beyond a reasonable doubt;” probable cause falls somewhere between these two levels. While a person may be arrested based on probable cause, conviction of a criminal offense requires proof beyond a reasonable doubt as follows:

Proof beyond a reasonable doubt is proof that leaves you firmly convinced the defendant is guilty. A reasonable doubt based upon reason and common sense and is not based upon and common sense and is not based purely on speculation. It may arise from a careful and impartial consideration of all evidence, or from lack of evidence. If after a careful and impartial consideration of all evidence, you are convinced beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant is guilty, it is your duty to find the defendant not guilty.

This discrepancy between levels of proof leads to the practical result where a person arrested for a crime may not be tried for that offense, since a mere arrest requires such a lower proof threshold.

Jaycee Ochob was last seen in the Republic of Palau around September 18, 2016, but her disappearance was not noted until almost a month late. After an extensive investigation, police submitted an affidavit of probable cause to support an information and arrest warrant for her estranged husband, Inis Remoket, Mr. Remoket was charged with Murder in the Second Degree, or in the alternative Manslaughter. After some preliminary matters, the matter was set for trial to commence July 11, 2017. On June 20, 2017, the defense filed a Motion to dismiss alleging a lack of probable cause to support the information, or charging instrument. This motion was denied by the Court, which found there was probable cause and also finding the motion to be untimely.

In preparation for trial, however, after a careful thorough review of the evidence under the greater scrutiny of reasonable doubt, the case prosecutor determined the matter should not proceed to trial and the case was dismissed upon motion by prosecutor on June 28, 2017.  This action was in accordance with the American Bar Association Standards for Prosecutors, Standard 3-3.9(a), which mandate in the prosecutor “should not permit the continued pendency of criminal charges in the absence of sufficient admissible evidence to support a conviction.” Since the matter was dismissed before trial, the dismissal is “without prejudice”, meaning charges could still be filed again at anytime with the statute of limitations. In the case of Murder, there is no time limitation in which to file a charge.

Kemeldiil er a DIRRADAI MASAKO EBELBAL NGIRAINGAS

~ Mlo semecher > June 22, 2017
~ Kemeldiil > July 15, 2017
~Tuobed er a mork er a 8:00am ra sebadong el July 15, 2017 el mora Ikelesia er a Koror Evangelical Church el ngara Emmaus el tal sikang (1 hour) e tuobed el mo mengemeldiil er a Klebeyang er a Ngebuked er a Ngaraard.
Ea 2:00pm er a telial sils eng mo tuobed el mo medakl er a Lelebai el ngara Ngebuked er a Ngaraard.

 

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R.I.P

Palau International Coral Reef Center
Press Release
Contact: Ines Kintoki
Phone: 488-6950 ext. 244
Date: 06/08/2017

 

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PICRC brings on new researcher to assist Research Department and Support the PNMS

Michelle Dochez from the the United States, has been hired by Palau International Coral Reef Center (PICRC) as the newest Researcher. With four PICRC researchers overseas pursuing their PhD and Masters Degrees, Ms. Dochez will full fill a large gap at the Center and ensure that the research department can continue to work while the researchers off-island complete their education.

Aside form assisting the PICRC Research Department, Ms. Dochez responsibilities will include support for the Palau National Marine Sanctuary (PNMS) Office. PICRC is committed to supporting the PNMS with science and research to help guide the management of the Sanctuary. The hiring of Ms. Dochez will ensure that PICRC can effectively support the PNMS Executive Director and the Executive Committee by developing and implementing the PNMS Science Plan as well as collaborating with different partners to ensure relevant scientific information on PNMS is gathered and available.

Ms. Dochez received her Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology for George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia and her Masters in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation from Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, California. Ms. Dochez first came to Palau in 2009 and was instantly captivated by Palau’s beauty, above and below the water. Ms. Dochez spent five years in Palau working as dive guide and an underwater naturalist with Sam’s Tours.

Ms. Dochez worked in clinical research for eight years and spent three years working in biomedical labs. Prior to returning to Palau, Ms. Dochez worked a s consultant with Sirenas, a marine drug discovery start – up in San Diego. She developed a benefit sharing solution that promotes marine conservation initiatives in, and provides financial compensation to, nations that permit Sirenas to collections of marine sponges and cyanobacteria whose chemistry is being analyzed for potential biomedical applications to treat cancer, tuberculosis, malaria and other neglected tropical diseases.

“I am really excited to have the opportunity to explore and learn more about the coral reef environments of Palau” Ms. Dochez shares on her new position. ” I hope to contribute to the important research PICRC is doing to benefit marine conservation efforts in Palau, the Palau National Marine Sanctuary, Micronesia, and the world.”

 

 

The Lord’s Prayer

July 9, 2017

This morning PICRC was visited by one of our loyal donors.

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Photographed left to right: Dr. Yimnang Golbuu, Ilebrang U. Olkeriil, Bernadette Valencia, Harlen Herman”

Ms. Bernadette Valencia the General Manager of Matson takes a tour of the Palau Aquarium.
Matson is a shipping company for Guam and Micronesia and Continues to be a large supporter of PICRC.

 

 

Anna Parker

Communications and Outreach Officer
Palau International Coral Reef Center
P.O. Box 7086
1 M-Dock Road
Koror, PW 96940  Palau
Phone: (680) 488-6950
Fax:  (680) 488-6951
Web:  www.picrc.org
Facebook:  Palau International Coral Reef Center-PICRC

 

 

The Lord’s Prayer

July 2, 2017

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